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March 19 at 8:15am

Nobody Knows Anything #9: Deep Metaphors

By Charles Peirce 

Nobody9-300Deep Metaphors are a concept from Harvard Professor, marketer, and researcher Gerald Zaltman that find their obvious use in marketing but have many possible applications for communication of all kinds. They are similar to Archetypes and Archetype Theory in that they represent a base symbolic language which communicates via the subconscious. But whereas Archetype Theory is based upon Jungian psychoanalysis, Deep Metaphors come primarily from the study of cognitive science, neuro-imaging, and linguistics. While not a substitute for Archetype Theory (nor a replacement), they are a useful tool in dealing with many issues of marketing, not least among them market segmentation and niche audiences. [...]


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March 14 at 8:15am

Forget the BS: Here’s the Key to Twitter Success

By Reid Rosefelt

The Key to Twitter Success 1You’re posting interesting content on Twitter every day. You’re blogging. You’re active in other social networks. You’re doing everything that you’ve been told to do. But you’re getting nowhere.

Maybe you have the wrong goal.

Your Goal is Not to Get as Many Followers as Possible

If you want followers, you can buy them. [...]


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March 12 at 8:15am

Nobody Knows Anything #8: Casting, Celebrities, and Archetype Theory

By Charles Peirce 

Nobody8-300Casting is one of the obvious essentials of any film, and like all aspects of the process worth examining: the assumptions that define it and the possibilities of how it might be used to best advantage. Casting’s key place comes in financing, where attaching the right star allows raising money based on their monetary value to specific regions or demographics. Enough attached stars offer the promise of pre-sales in distribution, and enough pre-sales can then determine a base budget. This would seem to follow the simple logic of a star’s popularity guaranteeing viewers, a shortcut in the task of finding an audience. [...]


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March 6 at 8:15am

Diary of a Film Start-Up: Post # 45: VOD Myths vs. Reality

By Roger Jackson
KinoSmall

Previously: $45 Billion by 2018

At Kinonation we talk to dozens of filmmakers every week, and often discuss myths about Video-on-Demand. Here’s my top ten…

1. Myth: Every VOD outlet will accept my film.

Reality: Most outlets select or decline films at their discretion and rarely give reasons for a “NO” decision. In the USA, only Amazon and Google Play accept all films. (Amazon is limited to Amazon Instant Video. Amazon Prime will typically reject films that contain drug use, sex, nudity, violence, etc.)

2. Myth: Theatrical creative will work for VOD [...]


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March 5 at 8:15am

Nobody Knows Anything #7: Archetype Theory

By Charles Peirce 

Nobody7-300Originating in the thinking of Plato but finding its modern applications from the work of Carl Jung, Archetype Theory is a way of looking at and defining the world that has numerous uses, particularly in marketing and storytelling. At the least, Archetype Theory gives a structural thematic underpinning to organize ideas around. At the greatest, Archetype Theory might allow a primal, subconscious form of resonance and communication with audiences — speaking to them beyond the limits of language. [...]


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February 28 at 8:15am

What Happens to the Filmmakers Who Can’t Market Themselves?

By Reid Rosefelt

XWhat-happens-to-filmmakersMaking a great movie is hard. Marketing a movie might be even harder.   There are many good movies every year, but there are far fewer well-marketed ones.  The list of people (and studios) who market films successfully year after year is a very elite club.

When I began working as a publicist, most American filmmakers weren’t expected to be able to promote his or her own work.  Nowadays every filmmaker is expected to be able to shoulder that burden.

How scary this must be for filmmakers. [...]


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February 26 at 8:15am

Nobody Knows Anything #6: Principles of Strategy

By Charles Peirce 

Nobody6-300Strategy is a great personal passion, but something I find few people have an adequate grasp of. While the basic assumption seems to be that advice of all kinds is inherently strategic and of value, it is often anything but. Any given suggestion or piece of advice is only worthwhile inasmuch as it allows the attaining of a goal — without knowing that goal and measuring the success of attempts to attain it, you are not operating strategically: you are merely using tactics of unknown value. [...]


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