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April 17 at 8:15am

Filmmakers: Why 1% is the Most Important Number

By Scott McMahon

Screen shot 2014-04-14 at 10.13.43 PMFilmmakers, what comes to mind when you think of 1%?

The “Occupy Wall Street” movement perhaps?

1% Milk?

Hmm … maybe …

1% RULE OF THE INTERNET

(From Wikipedia, because it’s fact)

In Internet culture, the 1% rule is a rule of thumb pertaining to participation in an internet community, stating that only 1% of the users of a website actively create new content, while the other 99% of the participants only lurk. [...]


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April 15 at 8:15am

Diary of a Film Start-Up: Post #48: What You Must Know About Amazon CreateSpace

KNLOGOBy Roger Jackson

Previously: Quality Control or Why Films Fail

Filmmakers frequently upload their movies to Kinonation after they’ve submitted to Amazon’s CreateSpace service. This is a truly excellent service for book authors, musicians and filmmakers to self-publish their creative work and make it available on Amazon.com. And in the context of films, a good way to make DVDs available without upfront expense.

BUT: for getting a film onto Amazon there are many reasons to use a specialist VOD aggregator like Kinonation, instead of CreateSpace. I’m not saying that out of self interest. Yes, Kinonation (or any aggregator) takes a fee or percentage of gross revenue – in our case 20%. But it’s much more about video quality, speed, marketing and, above all, access to many more Amazon US and global platforms, including Amazon Prime. [...]


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April 14 at 8:15am

BondIt: The Value of Strategic Partnerships in the Business of Filmmaking

By Luke Taylor & Matthew Helderman
 
UploadBuilding a business is an incredibly challenging task. You must recognize a problem. You must find a solution. You must structure a business model that is viable, strong, and withstanding. You must raise money on an idea alone. You must assemble a team. You must prove a market. You must acquire a customer base. You must create. You must operate efficiently and effectively. You must scale. Most importantly – you must provide a return. [...]


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April 9 at 8:15am

The Box Office Numbers for Favor

By Paul Osborne

TeaserPoster_WebSizedSmallThere’s been a recent battle-cry within the independent film community – lead by folks like Ted Hope and Jon Reiss – urging us filmmakers to publish the revenue generated by our movies, specifically in regard to new forms of distribution.  Unlike the weekly box office reports of studio films, the actual figures for indies, particularly those using newer release methods such as Video-On-Demand, are hard to come by.  Without them, and subsequently without any way of determining the success or failure of specific releases, it makes perfecting and improving new avenues of distribution quite difficult.   How do you know what’s working, and what’s not, if you don’t see the results? [...]


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April 7 at 8:15am

BondIt: The Difficulties & Realities of Producing Films at $1M & Below

By Luke Taylor & Matthew Helderman
 
UploadAs every facet of the film industry has experienced, the digital era has drastically shifted the economics of how films are produced, marketed, and distributed. Camera technology has reached a level that provides filmmakers at any stage of their career the ability to produce content with the potential of landing a fruitful distribution deal as the world has witnessed with films such as Beast of The Southern Wild, Like Crazy, Another Earth, and Martha Marcy May Marlene – all produced at 1M or under and distributed theatrically through studios. 
  
The financial ease of production that has developed over the past decade has increased the volume of films produced on an annual basis from 2,000-8,000 – creating a financial ripple effect in the production industry as labor rates, rental rates, and talent salaries continue to decline. [...]


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April 2 at 8:15am

Wake up! Don’t wait for the Sale!

by Jen Sall

Rapid advances in technology make it significantly easier and much less expensive to make a film today. A record 12,218 films were submitted for the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, 72 more films than the 2013 festival. Of the 4,057-plus feature films submitted, 121 were selected. Of those approximately 15 were purchased by the close of the festival. A few more have been bought in the past few months, not many.

Perhaps you beats the odds (you have around a 4% chance of your film premiering at a major festival and then 10% of distribution deal once it makes the festival) your film premieres at Sundance, Tribeca, Toronto, SXSW or a festival with a track record of sales.  Lightening strikes a second time and your film is bought. You are in the minority and you can stop reading this article.  If you are one of the thousands of other films premiering at a festival with no distribution deal or buyer in sight, a film that has never screened in a festival, or you developing a film keep reading. [...]


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April 1 at 1:30pm

Diary of a Film Start-Up: Post #47: Quality Control or Why Films Fail

KNLOGOBy Roger Jackson

Previously:  Why We’re Different

Quality Control

At Kinonation we’ve automated much of what has traditionally been manual. Films are uploaded to us instead of shipped on hard drives. Digital movie assets are stored in the cloud instead of locally at our office. Transcoding and metadata authoring is triggered automatically and happens in the cloud, replacing the existing process of “guy in a room for a day” — which is expensive and error-prone — with cloud computers that rarely make mistakes. But one very much human element we retain is QC — quality control. [...]


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