X

Looks like you are a new visitor to this site. Hello!

Welcome to Hope For Film! Come participate in the discussion, and I encourage you to enter your email address in the sidebar and subscribe. It's free! And easy! If you have any suggestions on how to improve this website or suggestions for topics please don't hesitate to write in to any of the blogs.

You can also follow me on Twitter or Facebook.

(If you keep getting this message, you probably have cookies turned off.)

September 23 at 8:15am

How Not To Negotiate A Distribution Deal Part 3

Evolving out of a recent presentation and interviews with members oFilm Independent, leading distribution strategist Peter Broderick has written an important set of guidelines for anyone seeking to negotiate a distribution deal for their movie. Shorter versions of this post have also run on IndieWire and Film Independent, and we’re happy to run the complete post here in three parts on Hope For Film. Read PART THREE BELOW. PART ONE HERE. And PART TWO HERE.
 

6 CRITERIA FOR DISTRIBUTION PARTNERS

  1. Find distributors who are effective and honest. They should have track records that demonstrate this as well as raves from other filmmakers who have worked with them.

  1. Find distributors who are flexible and will help you to implement your customized distribution strategy rather than requiring you to fit into a one-size-fits-all approach to distribution

  1. Find distributors who are willing and able to be partners. Some companies are only interested in being masters. [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
September 19 at 8:15am

How Not To Negotiate A Distribution Deal Part 2

Evolving out of a recent presentation and interviews with members oFilm Independent, leading distribution strategist Peter Broderick has written an important set of guidelines for anyone seeking to negotiate a distribution deal for their movie. Shorter versions of this post have also run on IndieWire and Film Independent, and we’re happy to run the complete post here in three parts on Hope For Film. Read PART TWO BELOW. PART ONE HERE. And PART THREE Next Week.
 
KEY STEPS TO TAKE

Identify the main distribution avenues in North America and overseas. In the United States there are ten:

  • film festivals

  • theatrical

  • semi-theatrical (single special event screenings on a campus, in a museum, or at a theater)

  • cable VOD

  • television

  • educational

  • retail DVD

  • direct DVD (from the filmmaker’s website)

  • retail digital (iTunes, Amazon, Hulu, Netflix, etc.)

  • direct digital (downloads and streams from the filmmaker’s website)

Overseas, the main avenues are television and digital, with limited potential for theatrical and DVD distribution. [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
September 17 at 8:15am

How Not To Negotiate A Distribution Deal Part 1

Evolving out of a recent presentation and interviews with members of Film Independent, leading distribution strategist Peter Broderick has written an important set of guidelines for anyone seeking to negotiate a distribution deal for their movie. Shorter versions of this post have also run on IndieWire and Film Independent, and we’re happy to run the complete post here in three parts on Hope For Film. Read PART ONE BELOW. PART TWO Friday. And PART THREE Next Week.

You’ve finally finished your film and have just received your first distribution offer. Now what?

Negotiation is an essential but little understood part of dealmaking. To make fair deals with good distributors, there are mistakes you must avoid and steps you need to take.

I recently gave a presentation on the secrets of negotiating distribution deals to a full house of Film Independent members. My subsequent interview for the Film Independent newsletter evolved into this Bulletin. It supplements my Special Report on festival and dealmaking strategies. It is not a comprehensive guide to negotiating distribution deals but does highlight key dos and don’ts. [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
June 13 at 8:15am

Case Study: A Lesson in Failure

By Beanie Barnes

_DSC5649As tough as failure may be, something good can come of it – an opportunity for improvement.  There is a stigma and shame that tends to come with failure, so much so that people rarely accept “failure” as an actual reason for failure.  We often bury failure and, along with it, any opportunity to learn and grow from examining it.

Failure is cumulative.  Just as success can breed more success, failure can breed more failure.  Which is why it is so important to learn from it.  That’s why, as noted in my previous article, I’m providing details about my failed effort as a first time distributor, working on the film, FOUR. [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
April 9 at 8:15am

The Box Office Numbers for Favor

By Paul Osborne

TeaserPoster_WebSizedSmallThere’s been a recent battle-cry within the independent film community – lead by folks like Ted Hope and Jon Reiss – urging us filmmakers to publish the revenue generated by our movies, specifically in regard to new forms of distribution.  Unlike the weekly box office reports of studio films, the actual figures for indies, particularly those using newer release methods such as Video-On-Demand, are hard to come by.  Without them, and subsequently without any way of determining the success or failure of specific releases, it makes perfecting and improving new avenues of distribution quite difficult.   How do you know what’s working, and what’s not, if you don’t see the results? [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
March 6 at 8:15am

Diary of a Film Start-Up: Post # 45: VOD Myths vs. Reality

By Roger Jackson
KinoSmall

Previously: $45 Billion by 2018

At Kinonation we talk to dozens of filmmakers every week, and often discuss myths about Video-on-Demand. Here’s my top ten…

1. Myth: Every VOD outlet will accept my film.

Reality: Most outlets select or decline films at their discretion and rarely give reasons for a “NO” decision. In the USA, only Amazon and Google Play accept all films. (Amazon is limited to Amazon Instant Video. Amazon Prime will typically reject films that contain drug use, sex, nudity, violence, etc.)

2. Myth: Theatrical creative will work for VOD [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
February 26 at 8:15am

Nobody Knows Anything #6: Principles of Strategy

By Charles Peirce 

Nobody6-300Strategy is a great personal passion, but something I find few people have an adequate grasp of. While the basic assumption seems to be that advice of all kinds is inherently strategic and of value, it is often anything but. Any given suggestion or piece of advice is only worthwhile inasmuch as it allows the attaining of a goal — without knowing that goal and measuring the success of attempts to attain it, you are not operating strategically: you are merely using tactics of unknown value. [...]


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print

This site could not have been built without the help and insight of Michael Morgenstern. My thanks go out to him.

Help save indie film and give this guy a job in web design or film!